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Predicting Lunar Standstills

Like the sun, the moon transitions between rising in the south (for the sun this is the winter solstice), and the north (summer solstice). However, the moon completes this journey from north to south and back again every 27.212 days. Unlike the sun however, the most northerly and most southerly positions change over time. When the peg in the moon ring is at the top of the calendar in Sagittarius and scorpio, the moon will rise and set at its most southerly points on the horizon. When the peg is at the bottom of the calendar in Tarus and Gemini, then the moon will rise and set at its most northerly point on the horizon. Over the course of just over 18.6 years the amount of swing between the most northerly, and most southerly positions increases to its maximum (The major lunar standstill +/-28.50 of the ecliptic), then back down to its minimum (the minor lunar standstill +/-18.50 of the ecliptic).

The calendar will mark a Major lunar standstill when the red node marker is in the hole highlighted with the moon. It will stay in this position for approximately 3-4 months. The major lunar standstill will occur during one of these months. When the blue node marker is in the hole highlighted with a moon, then there will be a minor lunar standstill during one of these months.

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